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The Air Force officially inducted TSgt. John Chapman into the Pentagon's Hall of Heroes, which recognizes the recipients of the Medal of Honor. Here, Valerie Nessel, Chapman's widow, holds up the Medal of Honor after receiving it from President Donald J. Trump during a ceremony at the White House, Aug. 22, 2018. Air Force photo by SSgt. Rusty Frank.


Chapman’s Medal of Honor Story, Legacy Celebrated at Hall of Heroes

USAF leaders and the family of TSgt. John Chapman officially placed his name and story into the Pentagon’s Hall of Heroes, which recognizes all of the recipients of the Medal of Honor. Chapman, who posthumously received the Medal on Wednesday, fought and was killed in the 2002 Battle of Takur Ghar in Afghanistan. Read the full story by Brian Everstine.


Sen. Markey Calls for Release of Pentagon’s Delayed Missile Defense Review

Sen. Edward Markey (D-Mass.) has called on the Pentagon to release its overdue Missile Defense Review. In a Tuesday letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Markey pointed to increasingly complex missile threats, cited his concerns over the Pentagon’s delay in completing the review, and asked for an update on its status. The Pentagon said in May the review, which was originally slated for completion by the end of 2017, would be released in “the next few weeks.” Markey cited increasing US spending on missile defense capabilities as well as debate about the utility of various missile defense technologies, which he said is likely to increase as adversaries further advance their missile capabilities, the US bolsters its defenses, and both sides look to new areas such as space for military advantage. That’s why the MDR must be completed and released as soon as possible, he said, adding that the need for a completed review “is all the more important in light of recent, concerning comments by Defense Department officials indicating the Pentagon is amenable to considering major changes in US missile defense policy, including pursuing development and fielding of space-based missile defense interceptors.” –Steve Hirsch

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Yokota Osprey Deployment to Officially Begin Oct. 1

The US military is deploying five CV-22 Ospreys to Yokota AB, Japan, beginning Oct. 1, the Japanese military announced this week. While the deployment will officially begin this fall, the aircraft have been at the base since this spring. In late July, when Air Force Magazine visited Yokota, the tilt-rotor aircraft were positioned on the base’s flight line though USAF officials directed questions about their presence to Air Force Special Operations Command. The Japanese Ministry of Defense said Thursday the deployment will help Japan and the US respond to “various circumstances” in the area, according to the Japan Times. Fifth Air Force Chief of Staff Col. Jean Eisenhut said during a July interview that the CV-22s are part of an increasing AFSOC presence in Japan, a location that is “ideal for their mission.” The base will eventually house 10 of the aircraft. —Brian Everstine

USAF Trying New Trainer Technology at Travis for KC-10 Boom Operators

Travis AFB, Calif., has been taking the lead in using both a new three-dimensional simulator and life-size aircraft mockup for KC-10 Extender boom operator training, the Air Force said Wednesday. The simulator provides better capabilities than the old one and can produce a three-dimensional image, providing more realistic depth perception for boom operators in training; prior to this the sense of depth could only be experienced on an actual aircraft. The new cargo load trainer, a mock KC-10 from the cockpit door back, allows boom operators to become proficient at loading cargo—a key skill because the boom operators also serve as KC-10 loadmasters. –Steve Hirsch

Strategic Command Signs Space Services, Data Agreement with Brazil

US and Brazilian military authorities have agreed to share space situational awareness services and information, the US Strategic Command said this week. Rear Adm. Richard Correll, USSTRATCOM’s director of plans and policy, signed the agreement with Brazil’s Defense Ministry as part of efforts to bolster defense ties with that country and to increase each nation’s awareness in the space domain. These data-sharing agreements increase international space cooperation and streamline the process for partners to request information from the Air Force Space Command’s 18th Space Control Squadron at Vandenberg AFB, Calif. The Brazil pact adds to SSA data-sharing agreements USSTRATCOM has with 14 countries, including the United Kingdom, South Korea, France, Canada, Italy, Japan, Israel, Spain, Germany, Australia, Belgium, the United Arab Emirates, Norway, and Denmark. Two international organizations, the European Space Agency and the European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, are in similar agreements with the US, as are more than 70 commercial satellite owner/operator/launchers. —Steve Hirsch

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RADAR SWEEP


—Ten finalists have been selected out of more than 70 entrants in the Air Force’s We Are Airman 2018 Recruiting Video Contest; the finalists have been invited by their major commands to attend the Air Force Association’s Air, Space & Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., next month, where a winner will be announced: AETC Release.

—The 38 North project cited satellite photos showing that North Korea this month stopped dismantling a missile engine test site despite a promise made to President Trump in June: Reuters.

—US forces conducted an airstrike in Somalia Tuesday targeting al-Shabaab militants about 29 miles northeast of Kismayo, killing two: US Africa Command release.

—The Defense Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Accounting Agency in June found the remains of US Army Air Forces 2nd Lt. Hulen Leinweber, shot down over the Philippines on June 10, 1945. Leinweber was assigned to the 40th Fighter Squadron at Misawa AB, Japan: Defense Department release.

—The remains of World War II Army Air Forces Sgt. Alfonso O. Duran, shot down over Yugoslavia in 1944, were buried in the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe, N.M., after being erroneously buried in a village in what is now Slovenia: Albuquerque Journal.

—Mosquitos at JB Langley-Eustis, Va., have been confirmed to be infected with the West Nile virus and the base is said to be taking precautions: military.com.

—The Air Force and industry are working together to test a new cybersecurity technology that has not yet been hacked, in spite of numerous tries: Fox News.